Islamophobia is a religious freedom issue Catholics should prioritize

This summer, we’ve seen a string of anti-Muslim incidents across the country. Many of them — including several brutal attacks of Muslim individuals outside of their houses of worship — occurred during Ramadan, Muslim’s holy month.

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Amid these concerning events, I’ve written and spoken about Islamophobia and how it is a threat to American Muslim’s religious freedom. Below I share excerpts from an op-ed I wrote for Crux, a panel I participated in hosted by Georgetown’s Initiative for Catholic Social Thought, and a Huffington Post article I was quoted in.

From Crux:

Dehumanizing political rhetoric about refugees and discriminatory policy proposals by presidential candidates also have a very real impact on the daily lives of American Muslims.

Young Muslim students have been bullied and called “ISIS” or “terrorist” at school. Some women have considered taking off their headscarves so they don’t appear Muslim. And even children have approached their parents with the heartbreaking question: “If Donald Trump is president, will we have to leave?”

In the wake of the gay nightclub shooting in Orlando, some Muslims decided to stay away from their mosques for fear of being targeted.

The comedian and actor, Aziz Ansari, told his parents not to go to services, even though it was the festive and holy season of Ramadan. In a recent op-ed in the New York Times, he wrote, “I realized how awful it was to tell an American citizen to be careful about how she worshiped.”

At its most basic level, Islamophobia is a religious freedom issue. American families can’t go to their houses of worship without fear of them being sprayed with bullets or graffiti. Men and women feel they must change the way they dress to receive fewer stares and the threat of assaults. Children are bullied at school because they are Muslim.

This is a reality that should alarm all Americans, especially Catholics concerned about issues of religious liberty. Continue reading

 

Video from “Faith, Hope, and Courage in a Time of Fear” event:

And from Huffington Post:

Given these incidents, many [Muslims] are understandably fearful to go to their houses of worship. And this is a shame in a country where freedom of religion is supposed to be a basic right. As a Catholic, I can’t imagine what it would be like to find my church vandalized or shot at during the lead up to Christmas, or to learn that in many places around the country, people who share my faith were beaten up outside their place of prayer. It would be extremely frightening. This is the reality American Muslims are living with. Continue Reading

 

 

One year left: Upcoming changes in the Catholic Mass

As Catholics, we’ve really got to enjoy the next year.  We’ve got to appreciate the fact that we can effortlessly recite the congregational responses in Mass, and sing the Holy, Holy and Lamb of God without following the words or musical notes.

Advent wreath in Georgetown's Dahlgren Chapel

Because starting on the first Sunday of Advent next year, we won’t be able to do that.  When the new Church year begins on November 27, 2011, the 3rd edition of the Roman Missal—the guide that tells the priest and the congregation what to say during Mass—will be implemented.

Announced by Pope John Paul II in 2000, this change will be felt worldwide.  With the publication of a new edition of the Latin missal, missals in every language are being retranslated to better adhere to the Latin version.

When reading through the new Order of Mass, the changes at once seem insignificant and massive.  Most of the wording is very similar to the current version.  But the small changes in syntax, rhythm, tone, and imagery feel considerable for those of us who have recited these words for years and attached great spiritual importance to them.  Being able to recite the responses in Mass without effort is a kind of comfort, and a disruption of that habit will be difficult to deal with at first.

Sample changes in the People's Part. Click for the full changes.

The changes in the music will probably be saddest for me.  I had wanted to have certain versions (the Mass of Creation) of the Gloria and Sanctus played at my wedding, and now I’m not sure that can happen.

Thankfully, the words of the Our Father have been left unchanged, which in my mind is most important.

While I’m not completely happy with the decision to change the missal, I have to remember back to my middle school and high school years, when I complained about the fact that the wording in Mass was always the same.  I realized then that because the responses were unchanging, I didn’t think critically about the words I was actually saying.  Recitation became a habit that didn’t require critical thinking.   While today I don’t have as many issues with the unchanging wording, my middle school perspective can be helpful during this time of transition.

As difficult as the implementation of the new missal may be, we must recognize the positive effects it may have.  We will have an opportunity to critically examine the words we are saying, and be forced to work hard to stay engaged during Mass, rather than passively participate like we can now.  And the whole purpose of these changes in the first place was to increase our awareness of God in Mass and in prayer.

Whether or not we are frustrated, optimistic, or unsure about the new missal, recalling the Serenity Prayer seems like a good way to move forward:

The Serenity Prayer
God grant me the serenity 
to accept the things I cannot change;
the courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference.
-Reinhold Niebuhr

Information about the new missal

-Background explanations from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops

-FAQs

-Sample texts- comparing the current and new wording

What are your thoughts about the changing missal?