City-Dwelling Shepherds: Thoughts Upon Leaving Jordan

No wonder we find metaphors about shepherds and sheep all throughout the Bible—here, in Jordan and the Holy Land, they are abundant.  Just drive a bit outside Amman and you’ll see little boys cleaning their sheep in the river or an old man guiding his flock across the highway. 

So it seemed quite appropriate with the Gospel reading at my last Mass at my English-language parish here spoke of the “good shepherd,” about the way God walks with us, and even carries us through life. 

As I reflect on my time in Jordan and those I’ve met and come to love here, I realize that shepherds are even more plentiful than what I’ve seen in the Jordanian countryside.  They are in my home and my university, in cabs and cafés.  They have carried me during the last four months.

In the way that shepherds make a home for their flock in places that may be far away and new, my friends and family here have done the same for me.  

When I was in Bethlehem recently, I bought a carved, wooden statue of Jesus carrying a small lamb.  I was drawn to it because of the way in which it captured the way God has been with me throughout my time in Jordan—through those the shepherds who have sheltered me, feed me, and simply given me room to play and grow in this new place. 

As I make my way back to the States, that statue will help me remember the shepherds I’ve met here, and the home that they will always provide for me here, whenever I return.

Palestine and the unanswered question

Back in 2008, I heard about a young Palestinian named Ibrahim Abu Jayyab, who made campaign calls to the U.S. urging Americans to vote for Obama, who he thought would help the Palestinian cause if he became president.  When I interviewed Obama in Indianapolis that year, I told him about Ibrahim, and asked him how, if elected, he might repay youth like Ibrahim who advocated on his behalf and who sought his help.

Interviewing Obama in Indianapolis in 2008

Not prepared to answer such a specific question, especially one calling into question the U.S.’s long-standing policy of blind support for Israel, Obama responded vaguely, talking about how the U.S. needs to be a beacon of hope for young people all around the world.

Four years later, Obama is vowing to veto the Palestinians’ bid for membership in the United Nations, a move that will no doubt please the Israelis but be received by the Palestinians (and much of the Arab world, for that matter) as a slap in the face.  (Here’s a great article that summarizes the issue.)

The president has not lived up to his own goals and many people’s expectations in regard to the Palestinian plight.  He’s backtracked on moderate statements, let Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu drive the discussion, and refused to stand up to the Israel lobby in America.

Though Obama didn’t respond to my question three years ago, his planned veto provides a clear answer.  If I’m disappointed by Obama’s response, I can only imagine how dissatisfied Ibrahim must be.